Back Pain

Pain Conditions

At Bay State Pain Management, Our Expert Pain Management Specialists Provide Effective Treatments for Low Back Pain.

Herniated Disk Pain Treatment

Herniated diskA herniated disk refers to a problem with one of the rubbery cushions (disks) that sit between the person bones (vertebrae) that stack to make your spine. A herniated disk, that can arise in any a part of the spine, can worsen a nearby nerve. Depending on in which the herniated disk is, it could bring about pain, numbness or weak spot in an arm or leg. Many humans don’t have any signs and symptoms from a herniated disk. Surgery is generally now no longer essential to alleviate the problem.

Symptoms

Most herniated disks occur in the lower back, although they can also occur in the neck. Signs and symptoms depend on where the disk is situated and whether the disk is pressing on a nerve. They usually affect one side of the body.

  • Arm or leg pain. If your herniated disk is in your lower back, you’ll typically feel the most pain in your buttocks, thigh and calf. You might have pain in part of the foot, as well. If your herniated disk is in your neck, you’ll typically feel the most pain in your shoulder and arm. This pain might shoot into your arm or leg when you cough, sneeze or move into certain positions. Pain is often described as sharp or burning.
  • Numbness or tingling. People who have a herniated disk often have radiating numbness or tingling in the body part served by the affected nerves.
  • Weakness. Muscles served by the affected nerves tend to weaken. This can cause you to stumble, or affect your ability to lift or hold items.

You can have a herniated disk without symptoms. You might not know you have it unless it shows up on a spinal image.

Prevention

To help prevent a herniated disk, do the following:

  • Exercise. Strengthening the trunk muscles stabilizes and supports the spine.
  • Maintain good posture. This reduces pressure on your spine and disks. Keep your back straight and aligned, particularly when sitting for long periods. Lift heavy objects properly, making your legs — not your back — do most of the work.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. Excess weight puts more pressure on the spine and disks, making them more susceptible to herniation.
  • Quit smoking. Avoid the use of any tobacco products.